Argentina: Subte Rides and Cheese Pizzas

Today’s mission is to find a better room. We go to the subway (or, subte) and get a re-loadable tap card. I ask for two but the woman behind the glass says we can use one between us (obviously assuming we’re temporary tourists and I’m too lazy to explain that we’re planning to stay) so we just get one card and can always get another later. The card costs 90 ARS, and we can load on as much as we want.

Vanuatu: N’gol Ritual – Pentecost

I wake up to a faint rumbling that lasts a few seconds, settle back in and just before I fall asleep, it happens again. Could it be a giant truck driving past? I’ve stayed here 3 nights now and haven’t experienced this before so it seems unlikely. At breakfast, everyone else says they felt the shaking as well so we give it a quick Google to find it was, in fact, an earthquake. A 5.2 magnitude from Tanna – maybe I did make the right choice by coming to Santo. Yikes. Google doesn’t pull up any articles about fatalities though, so fortunately I don’t think it was very serious.

Vanuatu: Million Dollar Point & Port Olry

I’ve met some nice French girls at my hostel who are hitting the blue holes today (which I’ve already done) but are kind enough to give me a ride to town. I’m kicking myself because I haven’t made any strong decisions yet. I’ve kind of been puttering about trying to figure out what I want to do, and I’m really just wasting time.

Vanuatu: Matevulu Blue Holes

Waking up at 4 is rough, why do I do this to myself?! I had spoken to the woman who runs the hostel last night and told her I planned to take a bus to the airport but she looked at me like I was crazy.

New Zealand: Glow Worms and Coastal Driving

Yesterday was mostly driving from Nelson to Greymouth along the beautiful west coast highway, making lots of stops along the way.

First we stopped to do the 1hr Braeburn track to a small waterfall, through a forest with black-mould covered trees and burnt orange leaves falling along the path.

Christmas in New Zealand

My wonderful family has come all the way from Canada to be with me on Christmas, which has become somewhat of a tradition since my first time living away from home in Australia 6 years ago.

Tonga: Perfect Beaches and Kava

Our last full day in Tonga! I’m gutted. 10 days sounds like a decent amount of time but it flies by so quickly!

Last time we were on Tongatapu we drove most of the west side, so today we’re going to hit everything east. One of our priorities is to visit the flying fox sanctuary, but our hostel host tells us that a recent cyclone caused all the bats to move and it’s now closed, which explains why we had so much trouble finding it last time. Conveniently though, there’s a family living in the tree across the street, fully visible from our balcony! Ches is almost as nerdy about the bats as he is about the fish.

A feast is displayed down the length of a long table

Tonga: Church on Sunday

We’re getting in a kayak when our mate from last night hops over the fence to the resort to tell us lunch is almost ready. We thought we had another 2 hours to kill but I guess the service ended early!

I’m excited to be attending a Sunday afternoon at a Tongan church. Sundays are a mega day of rest here. No shops are open, no one works, not even lucrative whale watching for tourists. The country goes into rest mode, and everyone goes to church.

Tonga: Resort

Today we’re moving on from Tongatapu to Vava’u. Before coming to Tonga I assumed Vava’u would be a nearby island. That’s usually how countries work, right? Island groupings within a reasonable distance? Well not really in this case. Vava’u is an hour’s flight away, about as far from the neighbouring country of Niue as from the Tongan capital. At least that somewhat explains why our tickets cost so much.